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EDUCATIONAL INTERIORS SHOWCASE SPECIAL CITATION, AMERICAN SCHOOL & UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE

ARCHITECTURAL PORTFOLIO RESIDENCE HALL CITATION, AMERICAN SCHOOL & UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE

MERIT AWARD, AIA KENTUCKY

AWARD OF EXCELLENCE, AIA NORTHERN VIRGINIA

The master plan of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary included the expansion and relocation of Boyce College, the seminary’s undergraduate feeder program, into the main fabric of the Seminary’s main campus designed by James Gamble Rogers. The principal thrust of the relocation was the renovation of the Mullins Complex to house 350 residents, the Boyce College Administration and faculty.

Mullins Complex is approximately 125,000 square feet and creates a “Residential College” nested in the predominantly Graduate-level Seminary.  The complete program includes 350 beds, student lounges, the Boyce College administration, faculty offices and meeting space.

The historic importance of Mullins Hall is founded in the lineage of this building in the career of James Gamble Rogers. The building represents one of the purest examples of Rogers’ interest in the Collegiate Georgian style which allowed Rogers in the 1920s to connect these emerging large-scale institutional university buildings to the cultural precedent of smaller scale American structures. The style combined elements of ecclesiastical, industrial, institutional and domestic precedents. While it maintained the picturesque compositions of its counterpoint style, Collegiate Gothic, Rogers’ Collegiate Georgian buildings were simpler, more modern in appearance with larger repetitive windows.